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NASA Spitzer Space Telescope • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
• California Institute of Technology
• Vision for Space Exploration
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Spitzer Articles

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Lifestyles of the Galaxies Next Door
The "lifestyles" of 75 neighboring galaxies are illuminated in this poster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Scientists say this fresh perspective of our cosmic neighborhood provides valuable insights into growth process of galaxies at a glance.
December 14, 2007

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Locating the Cosmic Dark Bodies Among Us
Like cosmic "ghosts," dark planets, black holes, and failed stars lurk invisibly among us. These objects do not produce light, and are too faint to detect from Earth.
May 30, 2007

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Spitzer Seeks Out Milky Way Dark Matter
Our Milky Way galaxy is heavier than it looks, and it's not too much ice cream, or cookies, that is responsible for the extra weight.
February 21, 2007

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The Milky Way: a Growing Galactic Family
Astronomers keep discovering new galaxies, right in our own back yard!
January 3, 2007

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C2D: Before Planets and Life, There Are Stars and Disks
What would a universe without stars look like?
October 24, 2006

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Galactic Soap Opera: Look and Listen
Galaxies are a lot like people -- they lead fascinating lives filled with drama.
October 3, 2006

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GOODS: Going Deep into Our Cosmic Origins with NASA's Great Observatories
What do you call someone who can see billions of years into our cosmic past? An astronomer, of course!
August 11, 2006

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Protons from the Sun: What You Can't See Can Hurt You in Space
Satellites and space observatories beware! Microscopic protons are shooting out of the Sun at speeds thousands of times faster than bullets.
July 26, 2006

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FEPS Asks 'Who's the Oddball?'
By determining whether our solar system is an oddball, we can begin to infer whether Earth-like planets and life are rare in the universe. Armed with the super-sensitive infrared eyes of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, astronomers on the Formation & Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Legacy team are looking for dusty clues that may help answer these questions.
May 11, 2006

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A Shocking Surprise in Stephan's Quintet
When astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope turned their attention to a well-known cluster of galaxies called Stephan's Quintet, they were, quite simply, shocked at what they saw.
March 3, 2006

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SINGS: Answering Astronomy's 'Chicken or Egg' Question
Did the material comprising galaxies come together to form stars? Or did stars form in their own small clusters first and eventually merge with other star clusters to form galaxies?
February 9, 2006

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An Infrared GLIMPSE into Astronomy's 'Zone of Avoidance'
By using the Spitzer Space Telescope's dust-piercing Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to lift the veil of galactic fog, astronomers on the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) team are showing the world that the Milky Way offers great insights into the processes of star formation and galaxy evolution.
December 20, 2005

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SWIRE: Piecing Together the Universe's History with Wide-Infrared Eyes
Nowadays much of the universe's matter seems to be organized, as stars, solar systems, galaxies, and galaxy clusters are familiar sights of the local universe. However this was not always the case.
October 27, 2005

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Cultivating a Planetary Garden: How Long Does It Take?
According to the most popular theory of planet formation, planets are akin to redwood trees, growing in size very gradually. Rocky planets like Earth develop over millions of years, followed by gas giants like Jupiter, which build upon rocky cores. But new evidence from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope suggests that some gas giants may sprout in less than one million years, more like planetary wildflowers than trees.
September 12, 2005

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Dr. John Bahcall (1934-2005)
With the passing of Dr. John Bahcall on August 17, 2005, the entire Spitzer team mourns the loss of a legendary scientist and a great friend. His legacy will live on, in part, in the discoveries of the Spitzer Space Telescope.
September 7, 2005

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Spitzer's Two-Year Anniversary Wrap-Up
On August 25, 2003, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope launched in to space and history by providing the world with the deepest infrared observations ever taken. In commemoration of Spitzer's second year in space, here is a review of the telescope's greatest achievements.
August 25, 2005

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Spitzer's Legacy: The Big Picture
Four hundred years after Galileo first pointed his new telescope up at the night sky to gaze at objects within our solar system, Spitzer Legacy Science Program astronomers are using sensitive infrared technology to observe galaxies at the edge of the universe. With the help of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, Legacy scientists have explored the center of the Milky Way, searched thick molecular space clouds for infant stars, and peered with infrared eyes through galaxies near and far.
August 11, 2005

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'We Hit It!'
The scientists and onlookers crammed into Palomar Observatory's 200-inch telescope control room knew that comet Tempel 1 had been hit by NASA's Deep Impact mission when they heard the voice of Spitzer Staff Scientist Dr. Bidushi Bhattacharya yelling, "Wow, it's getting brighter ... We hit it!"
July 8, 2005

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Understanding Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Many Spitzer Space Telescope results involve the detection or study of "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons," or "PAHs" for short.
June 27, 2005

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"Parting Thoughts" -- Life on the Inside, As Told by an Intern
As Spitzer intern Sara Leeper packs up to head home for the summer, she looks back on her time with a Great Observatory.
June 14, 2005

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"The Casual 'Cheers!' Moves Over To Make Way for a Buzz!" -- Life on the Inside, As Told by an Intern
Spitzer intern Sara Leeper recounts the excitement of being there the day the Universe changed forever.
April 1, 2005

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"Finding My Way" -- Life on the Inside, As Told by an Intern
Spitzer intern Sara Leeper continues her tale of learning the ins and outs of life working for a Great Observatory, as well as the challenges of finding the bathroom and the front door.
February 9, 2005

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"Astronomese" -- Life on the Inside, As Told by an Intern
From the outside, Keith Spalding looks like any other concrete administration building. However, the moment the automatic doors swing open, you enter a world which houses some of the brightest thinkers who live with their eyes to the sky.
January 28, 2005

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How Well Does Spitzer See?
So just how good are Spitzer's infrared eyes? Well, the primary definition of that is what we call resolving power.
August 19, 2004



The Spitzer Space Telescope is a NASA mission managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This website is maintained by the Spitzer Science Center, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology and part of NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center. Privacy Policy

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